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Policy/Federal

Access to Healthy Beverages
Action steps to increase access to healthy beverages nationwide include:
  1. Support Federal Child Nutrition programs

    President Obama recently signed into law the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act, which reauthorized, expanded and improved many federal child nutrition programs.  This new law grants the USDA the authority to regulate all beverages available during the school day and require schools to remove soda vending machines from cafeterias and gathering space in schools in order to limit access to unhealthy beverages.  In addition, the law requires that only reduced fat milk be offered as part of the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs.

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  3. Improve National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs

    The National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs assure millions of children have access to healthy, nutritious meals during the school day.  The Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act, which was signed into law by President Obama in December, requires that only reduced fat milk be offered as part of the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs.  AAP continues to encourage schools and child care programs should emphasize the importance of drinking water throughout the day and offer students the opportunity to do so.

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Limit Access to Unhealthy Beverages

Action steps to limit unhealthy beverages nationwide include:

  1. Regulate competitive foods and beverages sold in schools

    President Obama recently signed into law the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act, which reauthorized, expanded and improved many federal child nutrition programs.  This new law grants the USDA the authority to regulate all beverages available during the school day and require schools to remove soda vending machines from cafeterias and gathering space in schools in order to limit access to unhealthy beverages.

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Point of Purchase

Action steps for point of purchase nationwide include:

  1. Require menu labeling in restaurants to provide consumers with calorie information on menus and menu boards.

    The health care reform legislation that was signed into law by President Obama included a requirement that all chain restaurants and vending machines with at least 20 operations nationwide must list calorie content next to the menu item and provide a statement concerning suggested daily caloric intake. This provision will go into effect for all chain restaurants in March 2011.

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Media Campaigns

Action steps to develop media campaigns nationwide include:

  1. Develop media campaigns with consistent messaging utilizing multiple mechanisms The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) should work with the Department of Education, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to create a national public service campaign to educate families and children on the benefits of healthy, active living.
     
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  3. Develop counter-advertising media approaches against unhealthy products.
    The Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Communications Commission should work with the Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to create a national public service campaign to educate families and children on the long term health outcomes that result from consuming high fat and energy dense foods and not engaging in regular physical activity.  The campaign should utilize print, radio, internet, television and social networking sites to reach children and young adults of all ages.

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  5. Advocate with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for stronger regulations on food marketed to children

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) should limit commercial advertising on children's programming to no more than five to six minutes per hour, which would decrease the current amount by 50 percent; and prohibit interactive food advertising to children in digital TV and online platforms.  In addition, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) should ban the advertising of low-nutrient, energy-dense foods during programming that is viewed predominantly by young children.

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